Author Topic: Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)  (Read 1437 times)

Offline mike

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Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)
« on: September 03, 2012, 10:46:06 AM »
Has anyone tried using Foxy Phonics in JHS?  If so, do you feel that it was difficult enough for them?  Useful?

I'm using my ichinensees as guinea pigs, but it would be nice to have an idea as to what to expect.

Offline Marc!

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Re: Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2012, 11:58:11 AM »
I've used Foxy Phonics with one of my junior highs for a couple years, and it definitely has its ups and downs. It was good practice for them to get used to sounds and how they're represented on paper, but I honestly wouldn't use it (or start using it) for upper level students. The 3rd-years will just use their vocab knowledge to finish the daily practice rather than listen to your pronunciation or reading of each word and sound. The included spelling tests can be good practice though, and correcting mistakes that students generally all make is also good practice.

I would start it with 1st-years, and continue it as they get better at English. The beginning lessons are too easy for some 2nd and 3rd years, and while phonics are important, their time might be better spent with T/F quizzes, spelling tests, some other type of warm-up (like questions), or phonics more suited for their level.

I would try it if you feel they could benefit, but pay attention to how they react or absorb the info, and adjust accordingly.

Offline mike

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Re: Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 12:06:22 PM »
The 3rd-years will just use their vocab knowledge to finish the daily practice rather than listen to your pronunciation or reading of each word and sound.

This is my fear.  I really haven't been able to judge where my 1st years are with their English yet, but at least I didn't see too many students rushing ahead on the first exercise.  The way I look at it right now is that even if they end up doing this, 5 minutes a day listening to and practicing words outside of the textbook really can't hurt them.

Thanks for the advice!

Offline mike

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Re: Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2012, 02:25:12 PM »
Update:

I've just gotten through the first spelling test on Foxy Phonics with my 1st years.  Up until the "test," my students had pretty much aced all of the exercises.  During the test, however, the results spread out to more of a high seated bell curve like this:

5/5: 2 students
4/5: 3
3/5: 2
2/5: 1
1/5 - 0/5: 0
*1 Student Absent

I have to say I was pretty pleased with the test results.  I think it will be enough motivation for them to start paying more attention to the phonics now that they understand how the tests work.  I still think the course starts easy and stays at that level for too long, but I'm excited to see how they react when the sounds finally become more similar to each other or relevant to katakana English.

I'll try to remember to report back later in the year as well, but I'd say it's off to a decent start.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Foxy Phonics in JHS(?)
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2012, 03:58:52 PM »
I've never used Foxy Phonics (though I like the name...).  But I have used Dr. Phonics and Active Phonics.

I found that phonics can get old pretty quick, especially for the upper level kids.  So I usually just devoted a small portion of each lesson to it, teaching rules based on the book but without actually using it.  Just the first 5-10 minutes of a each class.

It worked out pretty well and I could also mix that time with things like spelling rules and interesting uses of English/common mistakes that I'd recently noticed ---a kind of FYI about English that they found (hopefully) more interesting.

A bonus feature is it also impresses your JTE if you can explain stuff like the rules of when to use "c" vs "k".