Author Topic: Edit the Sunshine Textbook  (Read 17953 times)

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« on: September 18, 2012, 12:41:22 PM »
I have been asked by Kairyudo (the publishers of the current JHS Sunshine textbook series) to help clean up their new textbook. 
Things like typos, or poorly worded/misused English etc., that slipped through when they printed off the new series that was released this year.

I'm going through them now and have already caught a few mistakes.  But I was wondering if anyone else has noticed anything that should be mentioned.  It would be a big help to make sure nothing is missed. 

Anything at all , even if you notice something in the supplemental materials or CD's.
Thanks.

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012, 04:56:41 PM »
We use Columbus 21, but if you had an extra copy of Sunshine I'd be happy to give it a look through.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2012, 11:00:18 AM »
Thanks for the offer ---the only spare copy I have is a sample copy from last year though, and it is rife with mistakes.
Just out of curiousity though, how is the Columbus 21 book? 
Have you also found many mistakes in it?

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2012, 11:50:09 AM »
I haven't really been keeping track, to be honest, but I'll keep an eye out from now on.  As far as I can recall, the reading segments are pretty natural and free of mistakes.  There's a bit of what I think is regionalism here or there that sounds strange to my ear, but every time I've checked it's technically been grammatically correct. 

I have noticed that the new vocab pronunciations (written in the footnotes and sidebar) are pretty poor, however.  But I guess that's why we're here.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2012, 10:34:26 AM »
OK, well here's a question for anyone to answer.
Read the following sentences and tell me which one is better:

1) I went to Sakura Park with my friends last Sunday.  We saw a lot of people there about noon.

2) I went to Sakura Park with my friends last Sunday.  We saw a lot of people there at about noon.

What do you think?

Offline fred

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2012, 10:38:07 AM »
Number two sounds a lot better to me. I would understand 1, but 2 is more correct.

Offline Jotham

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2012, 10:41:03 AM »
Yeah, number 2.

"around noon" maybe but not about noon.
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!

Offline fred

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2012, 10:44:41 AM »
Actually, I find about noon acceptable.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2012, 11:07:32 AM »
Thanks.  I think 1 is understandable, but I like 2 better too. 
It also keeps with the rule we teach to use "at" when referring to times.

Here's an easy one:

1) They speak three languages: Finnish, Swedish, and English.

2) They speak three languages, Finnish, Swedish, and English.

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2012, 11:12:00 AM »
1, no question. 2 is understandable but just wrong, if you're gonna list them it's gotta be after a colon. Although I'm more used to seeing items in a list after a colon separated by a semi-colon...

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2012, 12:54:33 PM »
As I understand it, about noon is adding temporal information to the verb and should be contained within a prepositional phrase to  act as an adverb - so number 2.  I wouldn't consider 1 wrong, though, because common speech drops prepositions extremely frequently.

But honestly, they both sound strange to my ear.

Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2012, 01:14:42 PM »
Number 2 on the first one, but it still looks weird because I'd be inclined to say "at around noon". Personally, I almost never say "about".

Number 1 on the second one, but again it looks weird to me because I would personally favour the use of brackets.

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2012, 01:21:08 PM »
Number 1 on the second one, but again it looks weird to me because I would personally favour the use of brackets.

Can you explain? I'm having trouble picturing what you mean, could you write it out?

Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2012, 01:28:17 PM »
They speak three languages (Finnish, Swedish, and English).

I guess it depends on how relevant the individual languages are to the overall text, but as a stand alone sentence, that's just my personal instinct. :/



Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2012, 01:31:16 PM »
Pardon me, they're "parentheses" in America-speak.

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2012, 01:39:57 PM »
Nah, i'm familiar enough with silly euro-speak that I was pretty sure you meant parentheses, just wanted to check that that was what you meant. I don't see that as being a preferable way to write it at all, that's why it was confusing. I'd use a hyphen to separate them before I'd use parentheses/brackets. Like. "They speak three languages-- Finnish, Swedish, and English."

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2012, 02:11:00 PM »
Thanks for the feedback.
I suspect they use "about" in the first one (not "around") because they are trying to use what limited vocab the kids know which still gets the meaning across.  Either one is fine to my ear, I was mainly wondering about "at".  And again, it could be a style thing.

This may be the kids first encounter with a colon  :-o, but I'm pretty sure that is the correct way to list things.

If anyone wants to read along, the sentences in question are from pages 14 and 19 in the Sunshine 2 textbook.

Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2012, 02:16:57 PM »
Nah, i'm familiar enough with silly euro-speak that I was pretty sure you meant parentheses, just wanted to check that that was what you meant. I don't see that as being a preferable way to write it at all, that's why it was confusing. I'd use a hyphen to separate them before I'd use parentheses/brackets. Like. "They speak three languages-- Finnish, Swedish, and English."

Doesn't that depend on how important the three individual languages are relative to the fact that they speak three languages?  If the individual languages are mostly extraneous, they can go in brackets, right? Otherwise I guess the most appropriate punctuation is in answer number 1.  The perspective from which I read the sentence may be incorrect, but there's no context offered. I'm reading too much into it though. Colon it is.

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2012, 02:28:11 PM »
I wasn't saying using the brackets was wrong, since it isn't... it just has a sort of more... casual feel to it I guess? You're right that there's no context provided and thus I don't really have any basis for saying it's too informal, but I generally try to avoid parentheses in situations where other punctuation will suffice. Parentheses always strike me as an inelegant way of wedging an additional fact into a sentence when you either can't figure out how else to say it or can't be bothered.

Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2012, 02:33:32 PM »
Oddly enough, I've often had the same feelings for colons.  They make me a little uncomfortable when I see them in the middle of a paragraph. Not sure why.


Offline Karurosu

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2012, 02:35:11 PM »
See what I mean?






Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2012, 02:53:48 PM »
LOL, Phantom karma for sure. Wasnt expecting that.

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2012, 04:44:03 PM »
Number 1 for the second one.

As for using parentheses, I usually see them used to add an interjection in the middle of a thought.  For example:

Quote
As for using parentheses (brackets are totes '[' and ']'), I usually see them used to add an interjection in the middle of a thought.

But maybe we just do it differently than the Irish.

Edit:  I thought about it, and I'm no longer sure that I stand by my explanation.  Parentheses are weird, y'all.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2012, 03:08:04 PM by mike »

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2012, 11:52:42 AM »
Thanks for the feedback.
I suspect they use "about" in the first one (not "around") because they are trying to use what limited vocab the kids know which still gets the meaning across.

OK, well a few pages on they do decide to use "around" so there goes that theory:

1. I called you around six.
2. I called you at around six.

PS ---also thanks for teaching me about brackets/parentheses

Offline jesse

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2012, 12:29:31 PM »
Program 5 section 3 introduces "some time" but as it is written as two words it is incorrect.  the usage in the book should be written as "sometime" so that should be fixed. 

The adverb sometime (one word) means "at an indefinite or unstated time in the future." The phrase some time (two words) means "a period of time."

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2012, 02:39:26 PM »
Program 5 section 3 introduces "some time" but as it is written as two words it is incorrect.  the usage in the book should be written as "sometime" so that should be fixed. 

The adverb sometime (one word) means "at an indefinite or unstated time in the future." The phrase some time (two words) means "a period of time."
Awesome.  That's a good one!  I wonder if any JTE's can tell the difference?
"If you like sports, let's play tennis some time."

Here's another question. 
Is there a rule about using Japanese words in English sentences?
Examples:
A: What do you think of sushi?
B: I think it’s delicious.

A: What do you think of samurai?
B: I think they’re cool.”

Now in this one, which is it?  And why?
A: What do you think of ukiyoe?
B: I think it’s/they're beautiful.

[by the way, ukiyoe means "woodblock print(s)"] 

Offline Josiah

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2012, 03:12:31 PM »

[by the way, ukiyoe means "woodblock print(s)"]

*Art History Alarm*

Fallacy. Ukiyoe are woodblock prints. The actual meaning is "Pictures [of/from] the floatingworld"

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2012, 03:16:58 PM »
Here's another question. 
Is there a rule about using Japanese words in English sentences?

I had this discussion yesterday with my JTE about geta and kappa

I've always stuck to this rule:
  • If the originating language of a loanword doesn't create a distinction between singular and plural, you shouldn't do so in English either (so getas and kappas would be incorrect).

In terms of usage, I treat it as plural when being used as a plural or as a concept (multiple kappa or the race of kappa as a whole) and singular when it is used in a singular sense (this kappa).  To decide what is proper usage, I use this rule:
  • Substitute the noun with the word "fish."

Seriously.  I still do it sometimes, especially in complex sentences.

For example:
Fish are cool.  My pet fish is awesome.  Do fish dream? 
Kappa are cool.  My pet kappa is awesome.  Do kappa dream?

If anyone has any sources that agree or disagree with any of the above, I'd love to read them.  Especially if I've been doing this wrong!
« Last Edit: October 03, 2012, 03:18:56 PM by mike »

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2012, 03:23:02 PM »

[by the way, ukiyoe means "woodblock print(s)"]

*Art History Alarm*

Fallacy. Ukiyoe are woodblock prints. The actual meaning is "Pictures [of/from] the floatingworld"

Well, this is part of the question I am asking then.
If ukiyoe are the actual prints, then the answer would be "they" rather than "it" right?

Is there a word for the technique in making these prints?  Or is it just engraving?

Offline Josiah

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2012, 03:35:46 PM »
I'm not sure if there's a particular word you'd use other than "make" or "create".
But touche - I get what you're saying.

I would refer to them as "them". As in "they're great". You can think of it as referring to pieces of wood, rather than a period of art.