Author Topic: Edit the Sunshine Textbook  (Read 18328 times)

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #60 on: October 11, 2012, 04:18:45 PM »
Haha ---yeah.

Here's another claim made by the textbook:
"Sven Olsson is our ALT.  He came from Sweden last year.  Cricket is more popular than baseball in his country..."

Of course soccer and hockey are the top two, but I didn't even know they played cricket in Sweden.


Also, what's the best way to say, お年玉 in English? 
(this is the New Year's money given to kids by their grandparents)
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 04:33:57 PM by Captain Bonerpants »

Offline Jotham

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #61 on: October 11, 2012, 11:09:29 PM »
I was always taught (and I think this is a grammatical rule) that if its a 2 syllable ending in 'y' the it changes to 'ire':
heavy heavier
happy happier
floppy floppier

so would go along with friendly turning to friendlier. fluently and the other hand has 3 syllables so doesn't go with this rule. if it did it would change to fluentlier rather than fluenter anyway...?
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!

Offline jesse

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #62 on: October 16, 2012, 02:21:50 PM »
book 1 page 54.

in the lets listed part, theres some picture of a dude, and they apparently named him Carol.  I cant help but think that it should be Carl instead.  unless there are in fact dudes named Carol out there.   

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #63 on: October 16, 2012, 02:39:36 PM »
book 1 page 54.

in the lets listed part, theres some picture of a dude, and they apparently named him Carol.  I cant help but think that it should be Carl instead.  unless there are in fact dudes named Carol out there.

They may indeed have meant it as Carl, but Carol can be a boys' name. It used to be exclusively a male name, and was a name of kings deriving from Carolus (from which we get Carlos and Charles). At some point in the last hundred or two hundred years though I think it got conflated with Caroline and became popular for girls.

Offline jesse

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #64 on: October 16, 2012, 04:42:11 PM »
book 1 page 54.

in the lets listed part, theres some picture of a dude, and they apparently named him Carol.  I cant help but think that it should be Carl instead.  unless there are in fact dudes named Carol out there.

They may indeed have meant it as Carl, but Carol can be a boys' name. It used to be exclusively a male name, and was a name of kings deriving from Carolus (from which we get Carlos and Charles). At some point in the last hundred or two hundred years though I think it got conflated with Caroline and became popular for girls.

i suspected something like that, and thats fine, but its really kinda dumb to put that in the textbook when its currently almost never used as a guys name(as far as i know). 

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #65 on: October 16, 2012, 04:57:31 PM »
Oh, I totally agree. That's why i threw in the bit at the start- I am willing to bet they meant Carl. But I would suspect part of the reason it might've slipped through is because technically it's not wrong.

The guy inside the Big Bird costume, for the record, is named Carol Spinney (although I have more often seen it spelled Caroll).

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #66 on: October 18, 2012, 10:14:44 AM »
Haha ---yeah, awesome find, Jesse.

There are 4 pictures ---the first two (a guy and a girl) are both labelled "Kaoru" and other two (guy and girl) are both labelled "Carol".
It's a listening activity to focus on the use of "he" and "she", so in the script the CD says stuff like "This is Kaoru, he is my brother."
Apparently, Kaoru is a pretty uncommon Japanese name for a guy too, though not entirely unheard of.  Someone probably just thought they were being clever by choosing names they thought all sounded alike.

Anyhow, I'm gonna suggest "Carl" ---though for all I know the guy could be named Carol considering he is a bit of a hippy wearing Lennon shades and a turtleneck and sporting a Lincoln beard...

Offline vankuzco

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #67 on: October 18, 2012, 12:04:40 PM »
Haha ---yeah, awesome find, Jesse.

There are 4 pictures ---the first two (a guy and a girl) are both labelled "Kaoru" and other two (guy and girl) are both labelled "Carol".
It's a listening activity to focus on the use of "he" and "she", so in the script the CD says stuff like "This is Kaoru, he is my brother."
Apparently, Kaoru is a pretty uncommon Japanese name for a guy too, though not entirely unheard of.  Someone probably just thought they were being clever by choosing names they thought all sounded alike.

Anyhow, I'm gonna suggest "Carl" ---though for all I know the guy could be named Carol considering he is a bit of a hippy wearing Lennon shades and a turtleneck and sporting a Lincoln beard...

"Re-illustrate the Sunshine Textbook"? That sounds awesome.
matt from tsuru.  until i can think of something witty.

Offline Mr. Cartmanez

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #68 on: November 08, 2012, 08:24:10 AM »
Not in the textbook, but in the Teachers' Manual of Sunshine 1, right at the top of page 150:

 Asking Who Is the Owener of Something
Too much of a good thing ain't so good.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #69 on: November 13, 2012, 10:24:40 AM »
Thanks again.

Sometimes I feel like I'm splitting hairs or just going cross-eyed looking at this stuff.  But what do you think about this:

"When I was fourteen years old, I had a chance to work in a hospital for one week.  I chose the hospital because I went there often when I was little.  There were many kinds of patients in the hospital..."

vs

"When I was fourteen years old, I had a chance to work at a hospital for one week.  I chose a hospital because I went there often when I was little.  There were many kinds of patients at the hospital..."

I know Japanese love to us "in" all the time where we might use "at", especially for buildings (ex: "Now playing, Eric Crapton, Live! in the Budokan").
But what do you think about "in" vs "at" in the hospital example?
« Last Edit: November 13, 2012, 10:28:24 AM by Captain Bonerpants »

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #70 on: November 13, 2012, 10:29:19 AM »
I think either is acceptable in this situation. It may not be the pattern I'd use in my own speech, but I don't see anything wrong with it and if you were to say it back home I don't think anyone would give it a second thought. The only part I might address is the were/are in the last sentence, but I think that changing it is not making it "correct" so much as changing the under-lying meaning of the sentence-- the usual occupants of a hospital versus the particular occupants of that hospital at that moment in time.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #71 on: November 13, 2012, 11:02:45 AM »
I think either is acceptable in this situation. It may not be the pattern I'd use in my own speech, but I don't see anything wrong with it and if you were to say it back home I don't think anyone would give it a second thought. The only part I might address is the were/are in the last sentence, but I think that changing it is not making it "correct" so much as changing the under-lying meaning of the sentence-- the usual occupants of a hospital versus the particular occupants of that hospital at that moment in time.
Thanks ---yeah, that's kinda what I was thinking.  Grammatically OK, but not the preferred use in conversation.  I just wasn't sure if it was maybe something like a UK vs US thing.

But then again, why is my Budokan example wrong, whereas the hospital example could go either way?  Is there a reason, or is that just the way it is?

(As for the were/are thing ---sorry, I think that was my mistake so I edited it out.  I did mention that I was going cross-eyed, right...  :wink:)

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #72 on: November 13, 2012, 11:45:36 AM »
I think the reason the Budokan part is wrong is because it's an established phrase. If you were to say "Crapton is playing in the Budokan" or "Crapton is playing at the Budokan", both would be grammatically correct and would convey the meaning. But it's the accepted phrase that we associate with an eventt because we see it in advertisements, on billboards and posters, to say "live at the Budokan/Madison Square Garden/etc." If you say he's playing in the Budokan, it might be for a concert, it might be just all by himself in an empty arena, hanging out and picking at a few songs. But to say "he's playing at the budokan" conveys a sense of an actual event. Kind of? It's sorta shaky...

Offline mike

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #73 on: November 13, 2012, 12:29:38 PM »
Hmm, I actually say "in the hospital" I think.  That might be because I see a hospital as a large facility with various places in it - like the food court, ER, the burn ward, etc.  I wouldn't say that I never say "at the hospital" though.

That second sentence is tricky.  If you say 'a' you are explaining why you picked a hospital over some other institution.  In that case, 'there' is awkward because it should refer to a definite hospital rather than an ambiguous one (which is the situation created by writing 'a').

On the other hand, if you say 'the hospital' you have now established a definite hospital, but we don't know which one or why we're suddenly talking about one in particular.  It would help if it were clarified in a manner such as 'I chose the hospital that I volunteered at..."

I would say, "I chose a hospital to volunteer at because I went to one often when I was little" or "I chose the hospital that I volunteered at because I went there often when I was little."


Regarding gigs, you can also say (whether it be grammatically correct or not) something like: "Hey, did you hear that Dream Theater is playing the Budokan again next month?"  Otherwise I think it can back to the idea of whether or not it can be subdivided.  They would play in New Orleans at The House of Blues.  They are performing at Stage 1 in Voodoo Fest this year.  To play devil's advocate to myself, I would also say that they are playing at Voodoo this year.  I guess what I'm getting at is... you can probably defend either way in most instances.

Offline vankuzco

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #74 on: November 13, 2012, 01:42:48 PM »
Oh oh I don't have the textbooks on me at the moment, but could you please please suggest that they change the section where it shows two people having a conversation on the phone?

The "you changed the plan" response is incredibly awkward and there are so many more things you could put there.
matt from tsuru.  until i can think of something witty.

Offline therowdyrob

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #75 on: November 21, 2012, 04:13:39 PM »
This has driven me crazy but no one's mentioned it so please correct me if I'm just crazy.

In Program 4, page 45, 3rd paragraph:
"If bombs hit the zoo, dangerous animals WILL get away and harm the people of Tokyo. So, the army ordered the zoo to kill all the dangerous animals..."

With all this past tense going on in this story, the use of "will" perturbs the hell out of me. I scratched it out and wrote "would" instead.

Offline jesse

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #76 on: November 28, 2012, 08:47:11 AM »
Book 1 page 66.

theres 2 sentences that say....

Fall comes in September, October, and November.
Winter comes in December, January, and February.

I think thats stupid, because those months come in the bigger entity, which is the season. 



They want to use "in" for the months, so i gave my JTE, "halloween is in october" as a replacement.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #77 on: November 28, 2012, 03:47:58 PM »
Fall comes in September, October, and November.
Winter comes in December, January, and February.

I think thats stupid, because those months come in the bigger entity, which is the season. 
They want to use "in" for the months, so i gave my JTE, "halloween is in october" as a replacement.
I see what you are getting at there ---Do you think it was an effort to try and mix it up a little.  What about just simplifying it as "Fall is September, October, and November."?  For example.

Also, what do you think of the claim "We have four seasons in Japan..."? 
I've heard Japanese state it like this and it often comes across as suggesting that Japan is somehow exceptional or is the only place with four seasons...
Or maybe this is not worth the worry.

In Program 4, page 45, 3rd paragraph:
"If bombs hit the zoo, dangerous animals WILL get away and harm the people of Tokyo. So, the army ordered the zoo to kill all the dangerous animals..."

With all this past tense going on in this story, the use of "will" perturbs the hell out of me. I scratched it out and wrote "would" instead.
Thanks ---I actually remember mentioning this to them before, but I chose the word "could".  Either way, "will" is no good.
When I first read their proposed textbook, I recommended they get a native English speaker to proof-read it for them since it was so messed up.  When they told me they had already paid a couple of people to do it, I suggested they get their money back...

Oh oh I don't have the textbooks on me at the moment, but could you please please suggest that they change the section where it shows two people having a conversation on the phone?

The "you changed the plan" response is incredibly awkward and there are so many more things you could put there.
I know what you mean ---I suspect it is a way to get the person answering the telephone to have more lines and to break up the caller's otherwise lengthy paragraph.  Also, it could be that a memo is being taken, even though this is not mentioned.
Since the caller says "Tell him we've changed plans for..." you would expect the response to be a closer echo in the form of a ですね-type question if at all.

Offline Jotham

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #78 on: November 28, 2012, 04:38:49 PM »
When I first read their proposed textbook, I recommended they get a native English speaker to proofread it for them since it was so messed up.  When they told me they had already paid a couple of people to do it, I suggested they get their money back...

I always wonder who writes textbooks/menus/billboards/etc when they're in English. The amount of errors all over the place is hilarious. It doesn't suprise me that natives have done the job (and a crap job at that). There are many unqualified teachers over here who have no understanding of the English language apart from that they speak the language. Can i ask how you managed to get the job? I think it's great that you're running it past everyone to get other peoples advise. It's difficult sometimes because I'm not sure if its the way Americans say it (I'm from the UK) or is it just a clear mistake.
Should we follow the strict code of grammar which we all ignore when we speak or should we be teaching students conversation English which doesn't always stick to the rules?
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #79 on: November 29, 2012, 10:56:26 AM »
I always wonder who writes textbooks/menus/billboards/etc when they're in English. The amount of errors all over the place is hilarious. It doesn't suprise me that natives have done the job (and a crap job at that). There are many unqualified teachers over here who have no understanding of the English language apart from that they speak the language. Can i ask how you managed to get the job? I think it's great that you're running it past everyone to get other peoples advise. It's difficult sometimes because I'm not sure if its the way Americans say it (I'm from the UK) or is it just a clear mistake.
Should we follow the strict code of grammar which we all ignore when we speak or should we be teaching students conversation English which doesn't always stick to the rules?

For the most part all those mistakes you are seeing are just written by Japanese people.  English slogans and such are often more like a decoration in an attempt to seem trendy regardless of meaning.  But I'm sure you already knew that.

As for this textbook ---I got a sample copy back in 2011 and wrote a letter to the publisher telling them what a piece of crap it was and how it had so many errors I would recommend any school thinking to use it should switch companies. 

I included several examples of the many many mistakes.  Their response said it was too late and they'd already sent off their proof copy to the Ministry of Education (and it had been approved!), so they simply thanked me for my advice.
Despite that, they did make a few changes according to my advice and sent me new copies.

I told them I would let them know if there was anything else I spotted ---which is what we're doing now.  Last year, they paid me to look over one of their supplemental manuals, but this task we are doing now is just a service, not a job ---it's for the kids...  Well, actually, it can probably be argued that it is more for us... :wink:

Unfortunately, there are many factors to consider when trying to revise a textbook, so I'm sure many of our suggestions will persist.  For each book there is a teacher's manual and several exercise workbooks which might also have to be upgraded.  Not to mention the flashcards and CD's ---the re-recording of which seems extremely unlikely.
Also, sometimes the English has to be "bent" a little to fit the students level of understanding.

All we can do is point out ways to improve the texts and hope they are interested in actually doing so.  Then when the new editions come out next spring, we can point to a corrected mistake and be proud that we had a hand in fixing it.

I do appreciate all the feedback on this topic so far, it has been a great help and has sparked many interesting discussions.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2012, 12:29:27 PM by Captain Bonerpants »

Offline Coleman

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #80 on: November 29, 2012, 11:14:22 AM »
I always wonder who writes textbooks/menus/billboards/etc when they're in English. The amount of errors all over the place is hilarious. It doesn't suprise me that natives have done the job (and a crap job at that). There are many unqualified teachers over here who have no understanding of the English language apart from that they speak the language. Can i ask how you managed to get the job? I think it's great that you're running it past everyone to get other peoples advise. It's difficult sometimes because I'm not sure if its the way Americans say it (I'm from the UK) or is it just a clear mistake.
Should we follow the strict code of grammar which we all ignore when we speak or should we be teaching students conversation English which doesn't always stick to the rules?

For the most part all those mistakes you are seeing are just written by Japanese people.  English slogans and such are often more like a decoration in an attempt to seem trendy regardless of meaning.  But I'm sure you already knew that.

As for this textbook ---I got a sample copy back in 2011 and wrote a letter to the publisher telling them what a piece of crap it was and how it had so many errors I would recommend any school thinking to use it should switch companies. 

I included several examples of the many many mistakes.  Their responded by saying it was too late and they'd already sent off their proof copy to the Ministry of Education (and it had been approved!), so they simply thanked me for my advice.
Despite that, they did make a few changes according to my advice and sent me new copies.

I told them I would let them know if there was anything else I spotted ---which is what we're doing now.  Last year, they paid me to look over one of their supplemental manuals, but this task we are doing now is just a service, not a job ---it's for the kids...  Well, actually, it can probably be argued that it is more for us... :wink:

Unfortunately, there are many factors to consider when trying to revise a textbook, so I'm sure many of our suggestions will persist.  For each book there is a teacher's manual and several exercise workbooks which might also have to be upgraded.  Not to mention the flashcards and CD's ---the re-recording of which seems extremely unlikely.
Also, sometimes the English has to be "bent" a little to fit the students level of understanding.

All we can do is point out ways to improve the texts and hope they are interested in actually doing so.  Then when the new editions come out next spring, we can point to a corrected mistake and be proud that we had a hand in fixing it.

I do appreciate all the feedback on this topic so far, it has been a great help and has sparked many interesting discussions.

Dirty Do Gooder....

Just kidding Boner (I like that much better than adding Captian or pants).  I think you are doing the kids and the ALTs a service.  Now, when's the next NOFX cover show happening near me?  And if its not in the works, could you take up that project as well?  Thanks

Offline therowdyrob

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #81 on: November 30, 2012, 08:56:48 AM »
Ahh! Even better! I fully support this "could."

And thanks for making this form. It's edifying to hear that something you hear sounds weird to other people. Especially now in Japan, I unjustifiably question my grammatical insanity haha
« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 10:22:50 AM by therowdyrob »

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #82 on: November 30, 2012, 10:14:23 AM »
Does anyone have any thoughts on using "enjoy"?

In the grade 1 textbook (pg34) they introduce a bunch of verbs as actions/commands:
Pick up your pencil.
Touch your desk.
Eat sushi.
Write your name.
etc...

Those seem fine, but then there's also:
Enjoy the school lunch.

I know this is towards the beginning of the textbook and they won't learn the gerund form until much later (ie: Enjoy eating the school lunch.) so I want to let it slide, but does this even bother anyone else, or is it just me?

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #83 on: November 30, 2012, 10:16:08 AM »
Does anyone have any thoughts on using "enjoy"?

In the grade 1 textbook (pg34) they introduce a bunch of verbs as actions/commands:
Pick up your pencil.
Touch your desk.
Eat sushi.
Write your name.
etc...

Those seem fine, but then there's also:
Enjoy the school lunch.

I know this is towards the beginning of the textbook and they won't learn the gerund form until much later (ie: Enjoy eating the school lunch.) so I want to let it slide, but does this even bother anyone else, or is it just me?

I don't think there's anything wrong with it. Wouldn't you say to someone "Enjoy the party!" or "Enjoy your weekend!"? Totally acceptable and used in my area of the US at least.

Offline therowdyrob

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #84 on: November 30, 2012, 10:32:46 AM »
Does anyone have any thoughts on using "enjoy"?

In the grade 1 textbook (pg34) they introduce a bunch of verbs as actions/commands:
Pick up your pencil.
Touch your desk.
Eat sushi.
Write your name.
etc...

Those seem fine, but then there's also:
Enjoy the school lunch.

I know this is towards the beginning of the textbook and they won't learn the gerund form until much later (ie: Enjoy eating the school lunch.) so I want to let it slide, but does this even bother anyone else, or is it just me?

They do seem to like using "enjoy" in somewhat awkward manners here. As my JTE explained our lesson plan of "First, we will review and then enjoy Karuta." While awkward and not entirely natural, I can't really object to they way it's used. It bothers me too but I think this is a skirmish that we can pass on.   

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #85 on: November 30, 2012, 10:42:57 AM »
Does anyone have any thoughts on using "enjoy"?

In the grade 1 textbook (pg34) they introduce a bunch of verbs as actions/commands:
Pick up your pencil.
Touch your desk.
Eat sushi.
Write your name.
etc...

Those seem fine, but then there's also:
Enjoy the school lunch.

I know this is towards the beginning of the textbook and they won't learn the gerund form until much later (ie: Enjoy eating the school lunch.) so I want to let it slide, but does this even bother anyone else, or is it just me?

They do seem to like using "enjoy" in somewhat awkward manners here. As my JTE explained our lesson plan of "First, we will review and then enjoy Karuta." While awkward and not entirely natural, I can't really object to they way it's used. It bothers me too but I think this is a skirmish that we can pass on.

Well, the problem here is that it's not being used in the imperative. When you're telling someone to enjoy the movie/meal/vacation/whatever, it's (grammatically speaking) a command. It's the exact same as saying "have a good time" or "take care". The person will have a good time at your command. But the reason it's awkward, in my mind, to say "we will review and then enjoy Karuta"  is that it's a verb which conveys a sense of quality which should be uncertain. Like, what if they're not going to enjoy karuta? They're going to play it, yes, but what if it absolutely sucks and they don't have fun? Then they won't be enjoying it will they? I can't exactly put my finger on why it's unacceptable, but I know it has to do with the difference between using the imperative and not.

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #86 on: November 30, 2012, 10:46:36 AM »
I don't think there's anything wrong with it. Wouldn't you say to someone "Enjoy the party!" or "Enjoy your weekend!"? Totally acceptable and used in my area of the US at least.
Your examples are sound and I know enjoy can be used in various situations, but somehow, as rowdyrob points out, its use sometimes sounds a little odd, though I can't quite explain why that is...

I thought maybe it was because to enjoy something seemed more like a reaction to the experience of actually doing something, so in this case it wouldn't really fall into that action category (this page also instructs the students to use these new verbs to play Simon Sez, by the way).

Also, whether someone can actually enjoy something or not is subjective, unlike touching your desk or writing your name, etc...

The real question is, regardless of whether it is grammatically correct or not, would a native speaker use it this way?  If so, why does it sometimes sound strange but not always?  Is there a reason we can point to?  Or am I just losing my mind?

Offline Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #87 on: November 30, 2012, 11:02:13 AM »
Well, the problem here is that it's not being used in the imperative. When you're telling someone to enjoy the movie/meal/vacation/whatever, it's (grammatically speaking) a command. It's the exact same as saying "have a good time" or "take care". The person will have a good time at your command. But the reason it's awkward, in my mind, to say "we will review and then enjoy Karuta"  is that it's a verb which conveys a sense of quality which should be uncertain. Like, what if they're not going to enjoy karuta? They're going to play it, yes, but what if it absolutely sucks and they don't have fun? Then they won't be enjoying it will they? I can't exactly put my finger on why it's unacceptable, but I know it has to do with the difference between using the imperative and not.
OK, I think we are pretty much saying the same thing here.  Its situational use is the confusing part.
Whether somone enjoys the lunch or not would be dependent on the menu of the day ---but as a courteous expression to wish the person have a pleasant experience (please enjoy the party, enjoy the movie, etc) it seems OK.

Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #88 on: November 30, 2012, 11:05:11 AM »
bingo. as far as I can explain it, at least.

Offline J.R.R.

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Re: Edit the Sunshine Textbook
« Reply #89 on: November 30, 2012, 11:48:22 AM »
I don't know if this has been mentioned yet:

I was asked to help run the "My Project 8" for the third years (the one on Halloween, oddly we're doing it now, not when I dressed up for them on Halloween). I noticed that all the dates were missing their respective "st" "rd" "th." I'm not entirely sure if they are necessary, but it felt wrong not to have it particularly when it is used to refer to the "10th night" but not in the dates?

Hope it helps?
« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 11:50:01 AM by J.R.R. »