Author Topic: Sending money to a bank in my home country  (Read 5737 times)

Offline Russai

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Sending money to a bank in my home country
« on: January 22, 2013, 03:35:45 PM »
I need to send money back home. I'm with the Yamanashi Chuo Bank, but have never done anything with that bank aside from use the ATM at 711 periodically.
Can anyone tell me how to go about sending money back to my Irish account from here?

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 03:52:28 PM »
Yamanshi chuo is a pain in the bum and expensive for sending money home.
Most people use Golloyds as it is quite simple once you have set it up.
An alternative is the post office but I don't know if you need an account to be able to send money with them.

Offline Russai

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2013, 04:07:33 PM »
Ar, I've seen GoLloyds pop up a lot in my searching.

I'm in a wee bit of a hurry though and need to send money back as soon as I can, so I'm pretty okay with taking a financial hit from Yamanashi Chuo while I wait for my postal registration to go through with GoLloyds.

Any particular advice on what I need to bring to the bank with me to send money through Yamanashi Chuo?

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2013, 05:04:04 PM »
I don't know the exhaustive list but I would say....

The swift/ban number for the bank you are sending it to.
Their physical address
Account number/sort-code/holder's name
A reason for sending money home (paying debts is usually fine)
Your hanko
Bank book
Passport
Gaijin card
A large amount of patience.

Offline MCAS

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2013, 05:59:24 PM »
I don't know the exhaustive list but I would say....

The swift/ban number for the bank you are sending it to.
Their physical address
Account number/sort-code/holder's name
A reason for sending money home (paying debts is usually fine)
Your hanko
Bank book
Passport
Gaijin card
A large amount of patience.

+JTE

I've done both. What Fred wrote is highly accurate based on my own personal experience with Yamanashi Chuo. Bring a JTE if you can as having some one who can translate will make the process faster. Even with my supervisor there it still took me an hour to do it.

 I strongly recommend that you set up a Golloyds for your future transfers, as then all you'll need is a Furikomi card and access to a Yamanashi Chuo ATM and you'll be able do it in minutes as opposed to the hour I spent at the bank when I did it.
Often wrong, but never in doubt.

Offline mike

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2013, 09:07:48 AM »
From the materials listed, this sounds a lot like how it works at the Post Office (JP Bank).  Simply for reference, this is how it worked for me:

1. I found the pamphlet for Remittance and flipped to the English section.
2.  I found the proper form for what I needed.
3.  I took all of those supplies to the bank.
4.  I pointed at the form I needed in the pamphlet.
5.  The form is bilingual, so I filled out it. Be sure you have the swift/ban code or routing number (which is possibly U.S. only), branch, bank address, account number, your address, your telephone number, the receiver's name, and the receiver's address.
6. Hand over the completed form with your zairyuu card and bank passbook for verification.  I think I also might have given them my Health Insurance card and foreign ID my first time.  They might request your hanko seal as well, although I didn't need it for that trip.
7.  I sat down for an extended period of time as they figured out the process, and I fixed a few mistakes I had made.
8.  They printed off the official exchange rate, I told them how much I wanted to send, they confirmed the exchange and reminded me of the transfer fee.
9.  A little more waiting and I was done.

It took maybe an hour, could have been quicker if we weren't flipping through dictionaries half the time.  If you need to get it done stat and you don't have a translator available if you feel like you need one (I'm sorry, I've forgotten what your level is), then I would say just go ahead and try.  The paperwork is probably multilingual and there's not that much essential discussion to take place.

Mind you, it took my transfer 2-3 weeks to process.  For your first go you might face similar waiting times.

Offline karta

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2013, 04:26:37 PM »
According to several people, it's still the worst way to send money.  Someone said it cost them over 6000yen to send money through the bank.  If it does take 2-3 weeks like Mike says, you may as well check to see if the post office will do it for you.
I have sent money through the post office only once and didn't have an account, but that was back when I first got here so it is possible that the rules have changed.  My JTE helped me as the post office is right next to school but i needed all the bank info from back home, a form filled out at the post office, my ID and money in hand.  It cost about 3000yen.  I dont remember how long it took but I'm guessing AT LEAST a week.

Its worth setting uo gollyods from here on out since you pay per use and dont pay for it when you are not using it, so its not a big deal if you only send money once or twice a  year.

Offline Russai

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2013, 10:48:20 PM »
Woops, forgot to thank y'all for your help!
I got it sorted in the end. It either cost 2,500 yen or 1 yen. They told me different figures at different times. The money arrived in my Irish account after a day, so I was well pleased with the turnaround time.

I reckon I'll set up a GoLloyds for next time though as the bank was technically closed when I did this. I just played the idiot gaijin card and they let me in at 6pm anyway, which was extremely nice of them.

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2013, 09:38:06 AM »
Has anyone used the new GoLloyds yet, GoRemit Shinsei?

Are the transfer costs still Furikomi cost + 2000 yen? Or is there now another 1500 cost?

Quote
The service fee is ¥2,000* and is not dependent on the amount you send. Yen-basis remittances are subject to an additional charge of 0.1% of the amount sent (minimum charge of ¥1,500).

Offline Terranasaurus Rex

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2013, 09:49:18 AM »
I sent home a big bulk RIGHT before the switch over, and I'm so glad I did. I haven't used it yet but...does anyone have any idea if the change over caused the HUGE change in exchange rate, or is it just a coincidence? It jumped about 2.5 yen to the dollar the day after the switch over.
Students of mine involved in traffic accidents:

Since April 2013: 1
In 2012/13: 8

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2013, 09:52:10 AM »
Which date did you send it home. The exchange rate could have changed by that much that day itself.

I think I have worked out my question...

That 0.1% fee comes into use if you are transferring yen to yen. Yen to foreign currency does not incur it.

Offline Terranasaurus Rex

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2013, 10:07:14 AM »
Oh interesting...but just wondering, why are you using GoWhateveritisnow to transfer from yen to yen? Couldn't you just do a normal furikomi in that case?

I transferred on March 1st, and I think it was like 94 at the time, and it had been pretty steady for about a week. Then it jumped up to 96-97 and has kept crawling up since. It could of course be the natural progression of things especially since it was predicted to go this high or higher, but the timing just struck me.
Students of mine involved in traffic accidents:

Since April 2013: 1
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Offline Croninokehige

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2013, 10:07:45 AM »
I sent home a big bulk RIGHT before the switch over, and I'm so glad I did. I haven't used it yet but...does anyone have any idea if the change over caused the HUGE change in exchange rate, or is it just a coincidence? It jumped about 2.5 yen to the dollar the day after the switch over.

coincidence. the dollar was at a three-and-a-half year high against the yen this week, and i can assure you that the forex markets don't really take a minor japanese currency remitting service into account

Offline Terranasaurus Rex

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2013, 10:10:46 AM »
I sent home a big bulk RIGHT before the switch over, and I'm so glad I did. I haven't used it yet but...does anyone have any idea if the change over caused the HUGE change in exchange rate, or is it just a coincidence? It jumped about 2.5 yen to the dollar the day after the switch over.

coincidence. the dollar was at a three-and-a-half year high against the yen this week, and i can assure you that the forex markets don't really take a minor japanese currency remitting service into account

Oh I didn't expect that. I just don't pay attention to the actual exchange rates...only what the email service tells me that company's rate is. Good to know it's not just them.
Students of mine involved in traffic accidents:

Since April 2013: 1
In 2012/13: 8

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2013, 10:16:18 AM »
Yeah, the markets fluctuate all the time especially in the last 6 months. So, the day you sent money could have coincided with a weaking of the yen of about 2 yen to the dollar.

I was just confused about the 0.1% but I won't incur it.

Offline Terranasaurus Rex

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2013, 10:39:39 AM »
Ahh I see. I took one look at that paperwork and went...'eew I don't want to read this.' I figured I probably just wouldn't use it again for a while and let others be the guinea pigs. So I guess I'm on the same page as fred. That said...when someone DOES use it for the first time do let us know!!
Students of mine involved in traffic accidents:

Since April 2013: 1
In 2012/13: 8

Offline Jotham

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2013, 11:20:27 AM »
When i was bringing some of my money from the uk when i came in sept i used a uk firm called fx firm. good rates with no charges (as far as i could tell). planning to bring some more of my savings over when the rates hit the top. not sure if they deal with america also but worth taking a look.
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Offline LIY

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2013, 03:59:32 PM »
I heard the new GoRemit shinsei uses a different intermediary bank in the US then GoLloyd's did. So it may cost more or less depending on who your destination bank is. 

Offline karta

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2013, 04:07:37 PM »
The new remit does use a different intermediary.  I don't remember which but the cost for me was still the same as it has always been which was $20 US in addition to GoLlyods remittance fee of 2000yen.

Offline cherello

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2014, 12:17:14 PM »
So I'm finally looking into sending money back to the states, and through most of my online searching, the general consensus seems to be that GoLloyds (which appears to now go under the name GoRemit) is the best option. Is this still true?

(If people here have other opinions, I'd love to hear them. I don't need to send money regularly, maybe just large chunks a few times a year?)

Offline fred

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Re: Sending money to a bank in my home country
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2014, 05:04:09 PM »
GoRemit is the easiest to do for people in our income bracket.
There are some other services out there I think but they are very very specific and you will have to do your own research. They tend to deal with people who send a tens of thousands to millions of dollars a year for business purposes.