Author Topic: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...  (Read 596 times)

Gman776

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Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« on: September 19, 2013, 02:58:07 PM »
So, I need some help.  I was asked to plan a lesson for our 1-5 English class (the top 1st year class) which will utilize the 6 Australian foreign exchange students who will come to visit our school in October.  The teachers asked they we divide the class into 6 groups with 1 exchange student to each group.  We'll have some introduction time at the beginning, then get into the lesson.

Any ideas?  I'm drawing blanks...  :|

Li_Li

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Re: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2013, 03:57:23 PM »
What about discussions / debates?   You could assign a different topic for each group have them debate it and then have a student from each group tell the class what they learned. [or something like that]

It could be interesting for the students to hear the opinions of the foreigners and it will also get everyone talking.
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Jotham

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Re: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2013, 04:06:47 PM »
I agree. I often struggle to do debates (or any kind of showing your opinion activity) with Japanese students.
Off the top of my head; breakfast vs lunch vs dinner. Which meal rocks!! Each meal could be broken into two smaller groups to make the six if necessary. It's an opportunity to see what, why, when, with who do they eat each meal with.
Breakfast is the healthiest. Lunch is the most fun because you each with your friends. Dinner is usually the best food??
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!

Gman776

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Re: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2013, 04:31:47 PM »
I agree. I often struggle to do debates (or any kind of showing your opinion activity) with Japanese students.
Off the top of my head; breakfast vs lunch vs dinner. Which meal rocks!! Each meal could be broken into two smaller groups to make the six if necessary. It's an opportunity to see what, why, when, with who do they eat each meal with.
Breakfast is the healthiest. Lunch is the most fun because you each with your friends. Dinner is usually the best food??

I like the debate idea, but it might be over their heads.  We've tried debate style stuff before and even the third year students struggle with it.  :|Cultural comparisons is kind of my fall back, but i'd like to develop talking points in that case.  Meals could certainly be one of them.  :-)

fred

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Re: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2013, 06:47:38 PM »
How about role-playing? Maybe the aus student can be check-in person/shop assistant/railway station person and the jp students can be the passenger/shopper/ticket buyer?

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Re: Teaching a Lesson for/with Australian Students...
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2013, 10:11:44 PM »
How about role-playing? Maybe the aus student can be check-in person/shop assistant/railway station person and the jp students can be the passenger/shopper/ticket buyer?

This would be good to let them see that westerns don't understand their accent and force them to stop speaking in katakana English.
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!