Author Topic: Hanko cards  (Read 2554 times)

kelloggs

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Hanko cards
« on: February 27, 2014, 01:17:42 PM »
I've been doing the hanko point system in my classes the whole time I've been teaching, but I've been thinking of ditching it for the next school year. In my experience, very, very few students seem to care about hanko and many will either ''forget'' to put them on their desks or just not bring them to class (the JTE and I repeatedly remind the kids that the cards are important and have to be brought to every class, but that doesn't seem to make a difference). The other problem I have with them is that the system is not very balanced, as some classes have had more opportunities to get points than others because of cut/extra lessons. I'm wondering if anyone out there uses a different participation point system or have suggestions on motivating kids to care about hanko cards. This is all a little premature because I have no idea what changes, if any, my school is going to make to Communication English classes for the coming school year, but I figured it wouldn't hurt to plan ahead (for once...)
How do you feel about people who go ''Hadouken!''

Gman776

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2014, 02:43:01 PM »
OK, so a few things you might be able to try to make things better and potentially solve your problems if you don't end up getting rid of Hanko. Some of this is what I do and it has solved a lot of the same issues that you are having. Some of it is stuff I'm thinking about implementing/starting next year if I have the time and energy to put in the effort to do the preparation needed.

1) Make the Hanko grade bigger. At first it was only 5 points when I got here. I urged them to make it 20 so that students actually participate in class. The school compromised and now it is usually 10-15 points for Hanko.  It makes it more central so students try a bit harder.

2) Collect the Hanko cards. I collect the Hanko cards at the end of class then hand them out at the beginning of class. It prevents students from losing their cards.

3) Give out new Hanko cards with each new semester - having a reset and seeing everything start fresh seems to be better than continuing with a single set of cards. It also makes it easier to count up each time for you come test periods.

4) Don't just always use the same stamp. i finally got a bunch of new ones so I'm going to start changing it up and hopefully the students will get into something of a collector mentality (trying to get unique stamps that I don't often bring).

5) Make your own stamps.

Finally, probably the most important I think is,

6) Don't set a year-wide standard for how the hanko are calculated and tallied. For example, if you get 5 Hanko that means you get a grade of 10. 4 Hanko grade of 8, 3 Hanko gets you a 6 etc. A static setup like this is really hard on the students and you for exactly the reason that you provided. Some lessons get cut. Some classes naturally get more hanko then others. Some classes don't happen. There are a lot of reasons that comparing class to class for Hanko just doesn't work.

The solution to the last one is a bit complicated to start off, but it really makes life super easy as you go forward. Use class-specific values to determine how many Hanko results in what grade. I do everything in excel with some spreadsheets I made.

I take the average number of Hanko that students got in the class.
I take the highest number of Hanko that any student in that class got.
I then pick a number in between those 2 to set as the perfect 100% grade.
Then you scale all of the Hanko number off that 100% grade.
This gives you a nice little curved Hanko score and gives several students in the class perfect scores and keeps any student from getting a grade of 0 unless they really didn't get any Hanko in that class at all. (You could potentially even give the students who scored above 100% in Hanko extra credit on their tests - this is something we've done once or twice here in exceptional cases)

It's definitely hard to explain, but if you set up the excel spreadsheet once, you can reuse it over and over again and then you never have to mess with the formulas again.

kelloggs

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 03:20:06 PM »
Thank you, Greg! Those are all awesome suggestions. :-D

Hanko points in my classes now are worth 10 points, but I've been considering asking my coworkers if we can increase it to 15 next year. I've also been thinking of adding special bonus squares, like getting a piece of candy when kids get 5/10/15 points. I'm surprised even now to see how worked up my students get when sugar is involved (I used to think that kind of thing would only work on elementary kids...).

Out of curiosity, how does one go about making stamps? There is an awesome stationary store near me that sells a lot of cute stamps, but making them myself could be cool. If I wasn't sure the reference would be lost on almost all of my kids, I would totally make this:

How do you feel about people who go ''Hadouken!''

aMandarinAlmond

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2014, 04:48:03 PM »
I want that stamp!

Gman776

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2014, 09:48:12 AM »
You can make stamps really easily actually. I'm sure you can find instructions online somewhere, but basically here they are:

All you need to do is get some rubber erasers and cut them up with an exacto knife. You can use all different size stamps, but the big ones can be used for some really cool ones.  You can use tracing paper or something else to draw out the design then fix that design to the stamp so that you can cut it up better. you can then fix that stamp to a piece of wood or a button or something with glue and put a sticker on the back for decorative purposes. It takes some effort and artistic skills but it works really well. At our JET orientation one guy showed how he made a stamp out of a caricature of himself that one of his students had drawn for him. He used it on all of his handouts.

Croninokehige

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2014, 02:03:46 PM »
Out of curiosity, how does one go about making stamps? There is an awesome stationary store near me that sells a lot of cute stamps, but making them myself could be cool.

For my birthday one year, Miki gave me a custom made hanko stamp. The stamp face was an actual photo of my face that she got from a picture on facebook, and beneath it said "Good Job!" She had it done through a Japanese company (I just messaged her to see if she remembers who and will update this post if she gets back to me on it) where you created the image you wanted on their website I think, and then paid whatever the cost and they sent it to you. It comes with its own ink for you to refill it.

It was absolutely revolutionary in my classrooms. Granted, I had ES and JHS instead of jaded HS kids, but my students flipped the FUCK out. Like they would go absolutely bananas the first time I stamped them with the Conor hanko and show it off to their friends. I never bothered with a hanko card, I just stamped the back page of the student's textbooks or the inside cover of their English file folder, and since it was such a distinctive stamp there was no worry of them ever being able to forge stamps. At the end of the school year we'd count them up and the student with the most in each class would get a little rinky-dink prize like a keychain from America or something. They were way more excited for the competition part than for the prize though.

edit- Miki just got back to me! The site for it is http://kaohan.jp (all in J-go I'm afraid, hope you've been studying!)
And here's what it looked like, in case you all missed my beautiful, smiling, inky face.

« Last Edit: March 02, 2014, 02:14:39 PM by Croninokehige »

Gman776

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 08:26:10 AM »
That's definitely badass Conor. I think I might look into that.  :-D

kelloggs

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2014, 10:55:00 AM »
That's AMAZING, Conor! Way to go, Miki. :-D I hope you keep that stamp forever.

I don't know how much my kids would care about it (see ''jaded HS kids'') but my husband and his eikaiwa students would love it, I'm sure. Plus, his face is far funnier than mine. :-P
How do you feel about people who go ''Hadouken!''

Professor Bonerpants

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2014, 04:01:50 PM »
I used to use money as an incentive ---I printed up some bills that I found online, only I would substitue my face on the notes.  I had about 20 different pictures striking different poses and things.  Even had a few with their JTE.  Kids liked to collect them.
-The benefit is you could hand them out without having to worry that kids forgot a hanko sheet.
-The drawback is the prep, since you have to cut up hundreds of bills to have handy.
I'd give 2 bills for volunteering and 1 if the student was chosen.  Each term you could reclaim the money and recycle most of it.

Next I moved onto a stamp system using little pieces of paper about the size of a postage stamp.  They came in different colours depending on the type of question being answered.  They were all custom-made with pictures from their textbook or seasonal themes like Christmas or Halloween.  Again they liked to collect them and enjoyed gluing them on their sheets.
Eventually I allowed them to draw their own pictures and made stamps out of them with a scanner.
-Like the money, they could be handed out whenever, but there was a lot of prep.

Now I use a stamp that I had made that just says GR8 JOB.  To avoid having kids forget their hanko sheets I have them paste it into the frony of their files.  Occasionally they still do forget, so I just put them on whatever worksheet we are working on that day and they can transfer them to their sheets later.
-The benefit is no more cutting little bits of paper/money...

I also try to use their hanko points during lessons.  For example, if we are doing a shopping lesson, I will tell them that the number of dollars they have to spend is equal to the amount of hanko points they have.  If they forgot their sheet I have a backup like using their age or shoe size.

Jacklostinred

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2014, 09:41:41 AM »
6) Don't set a year-wide standard for how the hanko are calculated and tallied. For example, if you get 5 Hanko that means you get a grade of 10. 4 Hanko grade of 8, 3 Hanko gets you a 6 etc. A static setup like this is really hard on the students and you for exactly the reason that you provided. Some lessons get cut. Some classes naturally get more hanko then others. Some classes don't happen. There are a lot of reasons that comparing class to class for Hanko just doesn't work.

The solution to the last one is a bit complicated to start off, but it really makes life super easy as you go forward. Use class-specific values to determine how many Hanko results in what grade. I do everything in excel with some spreadsheets I made.

I take the average number of Hanko that students got in the class.
I take the highest number of Hanko that any student in that class got.
I then pick a number in between those 2 to set as the perfect 100% grade.
Then you scale all of the Hanko number off that 100% grade.
This gives you a nice little curved Hanko score and gives several students in the class perfect scores and keeps any student from getting a grade of 0 unless they really didn't get any Hanko in that class at all. (You could potentially even give the students who scored above 100% in Hanko extra credit on their tests - this is something we've done once or twice here in exceptional cases)

It's definitely hard to explain, but if you set up the excel spreadsheet once, you can reuse it over and over again and then you never have to mess with the formulas again.


I made up an excel file that does all the calculations for you. Just enter the max # of marks they can get and the # of hankos needed to get 100% per class. It also gives you a number of points between 1-10 so you know how many kids have each mark and you can adjust the numbers easily to give yourself a nice spread.  Each semester is separate along with each grade so you can adjust marks based on each class/semester.


Jotham

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2014, 02:04:46 PM »
Change that H to an M and you've got yourself a REALLY freaky fraternity "notches on the bedpost" kind of spreadsheet going on.

I'm sorry,  :-X I'll leave now.
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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2014, 06:10:37 PM »
Change that H to an M and you've got yourself a REALLY freaky fraternity "notches on the bedpost" kind of spreadsheet going on.

I'm sorry,  :-X I'll leave now.

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Jotham

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2014, 10:15:23 PM »
Change that H to an M and you've got yourself a REALLY freaky fraternity "notches on the bedpost" kind of spreadsheet going on.

I'm sorry,  :-X I'll leave now.

Phantom karma!

What does this mean!? I see it often and really don't understand what it means. Don't care if i look stupid!
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Gman776

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2014, 07:34:31 AM »
Change that H to an M and you've got yourself a REALLY freaky fraternity "notches on the bedpost" kind of spreadsheet going on.

I'm sorry,  :-X I'll leave now.

Phantom karma!

What does this mean!? I see it often and really don't understand what it means. Don't care if i look stupid!

There used to be a karma system on the forum to reward good posts, kind of like a "like" button. It disappeared, but phantom karma is essentially a like ;D

Jotham

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Re: Hanko cards
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2014, 09:52:56 AM »
Change that H to an M and you've got yourself a REALLY freaky fraternity "notches on the bedpost" kind of spreadsheet going on.

I'm sorry,  :-X I'll leave now.

Phantom karma!

What does this mean!? I see it often and really don't understand what it means. Don't care if i look stupid!

There used to be a karma system on the forum to reward good posts, kind of like a "like" button. It disappeared, but phantom karma is essentially a like ;D

Ah...Being from the post-karma generation, I never really understood.
Thanks
Wouldn't it be nice, to get on with my neighbours!