Author Topic: Money order at the post office  (Read 3873 times)

Offline Iggy

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Money order at the post office
« on: December 06, 2011, 02:15:45 PM »
I am going to attempt to do this alone tomorrow, since I've been bugging my coworkers about other problems and I feel guilty asking them to help me with this, too.

I have established than I can possibly do what I need to do at the post office, and have the forms I possibly need (this is all assuming that there has not been some miscommunication already).

I just need to know if you guys have any useful phrases or words that might crop up when I speak to the post office people tomorrow.
Words that I'll need to use, questions they might ask, and so on.

Any advice on this process would also be greatly appreciated.

Offline Yamanashi PA

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2011, 02:45:28 PM »
Elaborate on what you are doing please... Sending money to a person?  A bank account?? Trying to receive a money order from home???

Offline K-Bear

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2011, 03:09:04 PM »
If a JTE could accompany you to the bank it would make things abit easier becuase of the language barrier.

If you are sending money home, I personally use Gollyds. No matter how much money you send, they only charge you 2000ï¿¥to tranfer funds to your overseas account. I also feel that they give a better exchange rate than the banks.

After you apply to Gollyds, and get a Bank Person/ ALT handler help you set it up with your bank, you simply tranfer money to your overseas account using an ATM machine. It is the same as making a payment to a company.

http://www.golloyds.com/index/en

Geshhhhhhhh...I feel like a commercial.  :?


OTHER than that. If you are just gonna go through the bank, you really should have a JTE help you. They can do really time and sanity saving things like: phoning the bank/ post office bank ahead of time to make sure that you bring EVERYTHING with you that you would need to make the transfer happen. Aswell, they could explain the process to you once it is finished so that you could tranfer money without assistance after the first time.

Hope this helps!

Offline shneen

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2011, 03:30:09 PM »
I do this all the time, it's not too bad of a process.  Go to the savings counter at your local post office (most of them close really early... like 4pm).

If you want an actual physical paper money order, tell them you want to do a 住所あて国際送金 - jushoate kokusai soukin
Cost is 2000 yen to the US, 2500 yen for other countries.   You'll want to check and see if they can send these to the country you need though: http://www.jp-bank.japanpost.jp/kojin/tukau/kaigai/sokin/kj_tk_kg_sk_index.html    (Japanese)

The form itself has both English and Japanese on it, so filling it out won't be any trouble.   Just make sure that whenever you write your name or address it's exactly as it appears on your gaijin card/driver's license.  The only things the clerk should ask you are to see your ID, and how much money you're looking to send (you can tell them either currency and they'll do the conversion and either let you know how much yen you'll owe or how much of the foreign currency you'll get for an amount of yen).

If you're sending to a US address, they give you the money order to send yourself.... I generally send via EMS so that I have a tracking number to follow it (costs 1200 yen).  Other countries I think they mail for you....  or at least that's what I'm gathering from the post office website (I've never sent one anywhere but the States so I'm not sure).

And if you're going to be sending money often to the same person, they can give you pre-filled forms with your info so that you don't have to fill them out each time.

You can also do electronic wire transfers through the post office as well. If that's what you're after, tell them you want to do a 口座あて国際送金 - kouzaate kokusai soukin. I've never done the electronic one, so I'm not sure what the paperwork is like.


Lloyd's is good, but watch the fees.  Lloyd's takes 2000 yen, the intermediary bank takes $10, and my bank used to take $12 or $13.  I ran into problems with them when they switched intermediary banks awhile back which caused my money to be routed through the Federal Reserve before getting to my bank, which made the intermediary fees like $60  :-o

Offline jeneko

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2011, 08:33:55 PM »
If you are sending money home, I personally use Gollyds. No matter how much money you send, they only charge you 2000ï¿¥to tranfer funds to your overseas account. I also feel that they give a better exchange rate than the banks.

I also recommend Lloyds if you are sending to a personal account, that's what David and I use and it's incredibly easy and straight forward
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Offline OxO

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2011, 01:37:52 PM »
I heard go lloyds was quickest and most convenient but the post office was cheaper?
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Offline shneen

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2011, 06:34:15 PM »
I heard go lloyds was quickest and most convenient but the post office was cheaper?

I'd say that's a fair assessment. Depends on where you're sending your money/what banks it gets routed through on the way there.   

Before Lloyd's switched intermediary banks in the States, I paid 2000 yen to them, $10 to the middleman, and anywhere from $10-$13 to my bank for receiving the wire.
After they switched their intermediary bank, my money had to go through the Federal Reserve to get to my bank, so I ended up paying 2000 yen to lloyds and then something like $60 to the Fed.

For the post office I pay 2000 yen for the money order fee, then 1200 yen to mail it to my mom, who's nice enough to deposit it for me.

If you're not sending money home that often, then Lloyd's is probably the easiest option. But if you're sending often then the post office might save you some in fees if you go the money order route.  Sending a wire transfer through the post office probably turns up similar fees to lloyd's.

Offline karta

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2011, 07:34:42 PM »
My only two cents is that GoLlyods intermediary bank now charges $20.00 to the US, so watch out.  I started noticing it maybe 6 months or more ago so I think it was changed sometime last year. 
Since I pay like $45 after all the fees, it isn't worth it for me to send a small amount of money home.  But, exchange rates are good right now so it's easier to write off the cost.

Offline Yamanashi PA

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 08:46:11 AM »
I never set up a golloyds account, I instead just asked my bank to transfer money from my J account to my US account.  First trip took about a hour, paperwork and all that jazz (plus, they kept looking everything up in a reference book).  The initial setup was 5000 yen, but after that I have not had to pay anything.  You can check a box that has them take the money out of your overseas account instead of paying it here, but for some reason my bank never takes out money for the deposit???  As far as I can tell anyways.  I'll check the current bank rate against what I sent and it seems to all be there, and sometimes a few dollars more.  Now, I stroll into the bank and se the same girl every month.  Its to the point now where I just sit down and give them my money (you still have to withdraw it, they wont do a true transfer) and my ID and set my hanko down.  % minutes later its done and they mail me the receipt the next day when it has been sent.  They never send it the same day???  So, maybe I got lucky, but my setup seems to work great for me.

Offline OxO

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2011, 10:39:04 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

Coleman, wow, your way sounds interesting. Even if I just transfer money twice I'd be doing well costs wise. I really should ask my JTEs about this. Do you have some sort of special account in Japan or just the same old regular one where you can't even buy stuff online or anything?
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Offline devilwoman

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2011, 11:00:47 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

It's really easy to set up a Go Lloyds account. I did it without help and had very very little Japanese at that point. Just fill in the online form (http://www.golloyds.com/individuals/register/en) and send it to Lloyds with copies of the relevant documents. They'll send you a letter with the transfer details in Japanese and English, just show it to the lady at the bank the first time you go. After the first transfer, you can make a card that has all the details pre-loaded, so next time all you have to do is put the card in the ATM and enter the amount you want to send.

I'm not sure about intermediaries, but my UK bank (Smile) charges me around 12 GBP for each transfer, I believe. It's not cheap, so I usually send money home every 2 months or so.

Offline shneen

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 11:28:58 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?

https://www.golloyds.com/bankcharges/en

Offline K-Bear

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2011, 11:48:04 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

It's really easy to set up a Go Lloyds account. I did it without help and had very very little Japanese at that point. Just fill in the online form (http://www.golloyds.com/individuals/register/en) and send it to Lloyds with copies of the relevant documents. They'll send you a letter with the transfer details in Japanese and English, just show it to the lady at the bank the first time you go. After the first transfer, you can make a card that has all the details pre-loaded, so next time all you have to do is put the card in the ATM and enter the amount you want to send.

I'm not sure about intermediaries, but my UK bank (Smile) charges me around 12 GBP for each transfer, I believe. It's not cheap, so I usually send money home every 2 months or so.

How do you make this pre-loaded card? My bank just told me to press in the numbers, but that sounds WAY easier. Even if you know the name in Japanese it would really help!

Offline The Notorious M.I.G.

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2011, 11:53:32 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

It's really easy to set up a Go Lloyds account. I did it without help and had very very little Japanese at that point. Just fill in the online form (http://www.golloyds.com/individuals/register/en) and send it to Lloyds with copies of the relevant documents. They'll send you a letter with the transfer details in Japanese and English, just show it to the lady at the bank the first time you go. After the first transfer, you can make a card that has all the details pre-loaded, so next time all you have to do is put the card in the ATM and enter the amount you want to send.

I'm not sure about intermediaries, but my UK bank (Smile) charges me around 12 GBP for each transfer, I believe. It's not cheap, so I usually send money home every 2 months or so.

How do you make this pre-loaded card? My bank just told me to press in the numbers, but that sounds WAY easier. Even if you know the name in Japanese it would really help!

When you do a transfer on an ATM, they give you the option of making the card for future use. It is after you complete the transfer but before they give you back your bank card.

Get one of the wee ladies to help you out when you do it the first time and they will ask whether or not you wish to make the card. Or at least that is certainly the way it had gone for me with every transfer i have sought help with.
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Offline K-Bear

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2011, 12:00:34 PM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

It's really easy to set up a Go Lloyds account. I did it without help and had very very little Japanese at that point. Just fill in the online form (http://www.golloyds.com/individuals/register/en) and send it to Lloyds with copies of the relevant documents. They'll send you a letter with the transfer details in Japanese and English, just show it to the lady at the bank the first time you go. After the first transfer, you can make a card that has all the details pre-loaded, so next time all you have to do is put the card in the ATM and enter the amount you want to send.

I'm not sure about intermediaries, but my UK bank (Smile) charges me around 12 GBP for each transfer, I believe. It's not cheap, so I usually send money home every 2 months or so.

How do you make this pre-loaded card? My bank just told me to press in the numbers, but that sounds WAY easier. Even if you know the name in Japanese it would really help!

When you do a transfer on an ATM, they give you the option of making the card for future use. It is after you complete the transfer but before they give you back your bank card.

Get one of the wee ladies to help you out when you do it the first time and they will ask whether or not you wish to make the card. Or at least that is certainly the way it had gone for me with every transfer i have sought help with.

Well! I know what I am doing next time at the bank. Does the card not have a name? Or is it just known as the `bank transfer` card? I have been sorely missing out. Thank you

Offline The Notorious M.I.G.

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2011, 12:11:22 PM »
It is called the " お振込カード " (Ofurikomi Kaado).

You will still have to enter an amount for the transfer each time but you dont have to go looking for the bank and putting in all the account details and all that crap.
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Offline K-Bear

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2011, 01:07:23 PM »
It is called the " お振込カード " (Ofurikomi Kaado).

You will still have to enter an amount for the transfer each time but you dont have to go looking for the bank and putting in all the account details and all that crap.

Thanks! I have it saved on the phone and will try to get one, the next time I do a transfer  :-D

Offline Yamanashi PA

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2011, 01:49:06 PM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

Coleman, wow, your way sounds interesting. Even if I just transfer money twice I'd be doing well costs wise. I really should ask my JTEs about this. Do you have some sort of special account in Japan or just the same old regular one where you can't even buy stuff online or anything?


I just had my super call the bank and tell them what I wanted to do.  I then drove to the bank, sat down and the worker bees went into action.  I took my hanko, my US bank checkbook, and the phone number for my local US bank.  They did the rest.  My account is normal.  It takes anywhere from 2-4 days for the funds to transfer.  The golloyds would be quicker at times, but I like the regular routine of popping in once a month and doing some banking with the locals... 

Offline Yamanashi PA

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2011, 01:52:10 PM »
It is called the " お振込カード " (Ofurikomi Kaado).

You will still have to enter an amount for the transfer each time but you dont have to go looking for the bank and putting in all the account details and all that crap.

Also, you can make a furikomi card for any bill you pay regularly.  I pay my rent and my bike payment with  furikomi cards...

Offline Khaleesi

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #19 on: December 08, 2011, 03:13:10 PM »
I love my furikomi cards.  For Rent and golloyds it works like a charm.
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Offline Josiah

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2011, 06:42:06 PM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

Coleman, wow, your way sounds interesting. Even if I just transfer money twice I'd be doing well costs wise. I really should ask my JTEs about this. Do you have some sort of special account in Japan or just the same old regular one where you can't even buy stuff online or anything?


I just had my super call the bank and tell them what I wanted to do.  I then drove to the bank, sat down and the worker bees went into action.  I took my hanko, my US bank checkbook, and the phone number for my local US bank.  They did the rest.  My account is normal.  It takes anywhere from 2-4 days for the funds to transfer.  The golloyds would be quicker at times, but I like the regular routine of popping in once a month and doing some banking with the locals...


When I did the same thing it was a complete nightmare. They spoke 0 English, and although my Japanese can be good at times, I'm usueless as tits on a bull for official things. It took almost 45 minutes just to figure out how to do the paperwork, and they charged me between 6000 and 8000 yen... I don't remember which. It took a week for it to get to Canada.

I don't think I'd ever really do that again unless I was desperate.

Offline Yamanashi PA

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2011, 08:35:15 AM »
Any idea how to find out about what intermediaries are used?
I really should have opened a lloyds account when I had the chance. Gah.

Coleman, wow, your way sounds interesting. Even if I just transfer money twice I'd be doing well costs wise. I really should ask my JTEs about this. Do you have some sort of special account in Japan or just the same old regular one where you can't even buy stuff online or anything?


Yes, the first time is a bit of a hassle, and they do charge you a fee to set paperwork up.  But, after the first trip you should be able to just walk in and have everything ready to sign and send.


I just had my super call the bank and tell them what I wanted to do.  I then drove to the bank, sat down and the worker bees went into action.  I took my hanko, my US bank checkbook, and the phone number for my local US bank.  They did the rest.  My account is normal.  It takes anywhere from 2-4 days for the funds to transfer.  The golloyds would be quicker at times, but I like the regular routine of popping in once a month and doing some banking with the locals...


When I did the same thing it was a complete nightmare. They spoke 0 English, and although my Japanese can be good at times, I'm usueless as tits on a bull for official things. It took almost 45 minutes just to figure out how to do the paperwork, and they charged me between 6000 and 8000 yen... I don't remember which. It took a week for it to get to Canada.

I don't think I'd ever really do that again unless I was desperate.

Offline OxO

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2012, 11:57:12 AM »
was there meant to be any reply there to that last post?

Now is the time I really need to be transferring money and super unsure on what to do. I doubt any jtes have time to go to the bank right now
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Offline K-Bear

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Re: Money order at the post office
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2012, 12:26:37 PM »
was there meant to be any reply there to that last post?

Now is the time I really need to be transferring money and super unsure on what to do. I doubt any jtes have time to go to the bank right now

All our methods are slightly different, but they work for us.

I think it`s down to your own preference.

After this thread I got a お振込カード " (Ofurikomi Kaado) from my bank to make my Loyds transfers much easier. The process took minutes and was done at the ATM machine with a helpful bank worker (mind you I already had a Loyds account). I still use Loyds because my bank transfer fees are reasonable (maybe because I use RBC in Canada?), and because it is fast.